Another Wounded Pilgrim

Giovanna ‘s first public speaking gig

We know how much violence has resulted in recent times from the attempt to eliminate God and the divine from the horizon of humanity, and we are aware of the importance of witnessing in our societies to that primordial openness to transcendence which lies deep within the human heart. In this, we also sense our closeness to all those men and women who, although not identifying themselves as followers of any religious tradition, are nonetheless searching for truth, goodness and beauty, the truth, goodness and beauty of God. They are our valued allies in the commitment to defending human dignity, in building a peaceful coexistence between peoples and in safeguarding and caring for creation.

parabola-magazine:

The true contemplative is not the one who prepares his mind for a particular message that he wants or expects to hear, but is one who remains empty because he knows that he can never expect to anticipate the words that will transform his darkness into light. He does not even anticipate a special kind of transformation. He does not demand light instead of darkness. He waits on the Word of God in silence, and, when he is “answered,” it is not so much by a world that bursts into his silence. It is by silence itself, suddenly, inexplicably revealing itself to him as a world of great power, full of the voice of God.
–Thomas Merton, Dialogues with Silence, ed. Jonathan Montaldo (HarperSanFrancisco).
Quoted in “Arcs” PARABOLA, Volume 33, No. 1, Spring 2008: “Silence.”
Photo Credit: Elizabeth Gadd, “Untitled,” 2012 via: Vectorave.

Aspiration

parabola-magazine:

The true contemplative is not the one who prepares his mind for a particular message that he wants or expects to hear, but is one who remains empty because he knows that he can never expect to anticipate the words that will transform his darkness into light. He does not even anticipate a special kind of transformation. He does not demand light instead of darkness. He waits on the Word of God in silence, and, when he is “answered,” it is not so much by a world that bursts into his silence. It is by silence itself, suddenly, inexplicably revealing itself to him as a world of great power, full of the voice of God.

–Thomas Merton, Dialogues with Silence, ed. Jonathan Montaldo (HarperSanFrancisco).

Quoted in “Arcs” PARABOLA, Volume 33, No. 1, Spring 2008: “Silence.”

Photo Credit: Elizabeth Gadd, “Untitled,” 2012 via: Vectorave.

Aspiration

michaelwalks:

My name is Michael, and that’s my dog, Jack. He’s my best friend. www.MichaelWalks.com.

Please help me out by SHARING and REBLOGGING these photos with your friends!

In 2011, Jack and I walked across America. We encountered so many amazing people and places with interesting stories that we want to do it again, and then SHARE ALL OF OUR EXPERIENCES WITH YOU! [ Watch this video. ]

The best way to experience this country is to walk through it—to see the scenery all around you, to meet the people along the way. I know that not everyone is able set off on this sort of adventure, so it will be my pleasure to share what we see with all of you—through photos, videos, and written updates.

If this interests you, please SHARE this photo! What makes this trip valuable is the opportunity for me to share it with you.

I am also a violinist and street performer. I make a living off the tips I receive in my case on the street. You can listen to some of my music at www.MichaelWalks.com/music. If you like it, feel free to tip a few dollars online [ on my website ].

To follow my upcoming journey, simply click LIKE on my Facebook page

I hope to see you on the road!

Michael
www.MichaelWalks.com

This guy is really good!

Fern Valley, CA

Sunset at the Lost Whale Inn

Sunset at the Lost Whale Inn

parabola-magazine:

Each of us, as we journey through life, has the opportunity to find andto give his or her unique gift.  Whether this gift is quiet or small in theeyes of the world does not matter at all—not at all; it is through thefinding and the giving that we may come to know the joy that liesat the center of both the dark times and the light.—Helen M. Luke was a Jungian counselor, author, and frequent contributor and advisor to PARABOLA. She passed away at her home at the Apple Farm Community in Three Rivers, Michigan on January 6th, 1995, at the age of 90.
Photograph: Hiroshi Yamazaki, The Sun is Longing for the Sea (1978)

Awesome

parabola-magazine:

Each of us, as we journey through life, has the opportunity to find and
to give his or her unique gift.  Whether this gift is quiet or small in the
eyes of the world does not matter at all—not at all; it is through the
finding and the giving that we may come to know the joy that lies
at the center of both the dark times and the light.

—Helen M. Luke was a Jungian counselor, author, and frequent contributor and advisor to PARABOLA. She passed away at her home at the Apple Farm Community in Three Rivers, Michigan on January 6th, 1995, at the age of 90.

Photograph: Hiroshi Yamazaki, The Sun is Longing for the Sea (1978)

Awesome

parabola-magazine:

The Poet with His Face in His HandsYou want to cry aloud for yourmistakes. But to tell the truth the worlddoesn’t need anymore of that sound.So if you’re going to do it and can’tstop yourself, if your pretty mouth can’thold it in, at least go by yourself acrossthe forty fields and the forty dark inclinesof rocks and water to the place wherethe falls are flinging out their white sheetslike crazy, and there is a cave behind all thatjubilation and water fun and you canstand there, under it, and roar all youwant and nothing will be disturbed; you candrip with despair all afternoon and still,on a green branch, its wings just lightly touchedby the passing foil of the water, the thrush,puffing out its spotted breast, will singof the perfect, stone-hard beauty of everything.–Mary Oliver
Painting: Prince Eugen, Swedish, 1865-1947, The Cloud, 1896. Oil on canvas, 119 x 109 cm.

Beautiful

parabola-magazine:

The Poet with His Face in His Hands

You want to cry aloud for your
mistakes. But to tell the truth the world
doesn’t need anymore of that sound.

So if you’re going to do it and can’t
stop yourself, if your pretty mouth can’t
hold it in, at least go by yourself across

the forty fields and the forty dark inclines
of rocks and water to the place where
the falls are flinging out their white sheets

like crazy, and there is a cave behind all that
jubilation and water fun and you can
stand there, under it, and roar all you

want and nothing will be disturbed; you can
drip with despair all afternoon and still,
on a green branch, its wings just lightly touched

by the passing foil of the water, the thrush,
puffing out its spotted breast, will sing
of the perfect, stone-hard beauty of everything.

–Mary Oliver

Painting: Prince Eugen, Swedish, 1865-1947, The Cloud, 1896. Oil on canvas, 119 x 109 cm.

Beautiful

Aly’s 7th Birthday

Annie Dillard

Annie Dillard